Ten eBooks I’ve Owned FOREVER

Posted May 4, 2017 / Book Lists, Features / 17 Comments

I love freebie week for TTT because it brings so many other topics to my attention for me to steal borrow later on (with credit of course!). Pure Imagination featured a TTT of top ten books that have been on her Kindle for way too long… and I knew I needed to tackle this topic in one way or another!

Top 10 Kindle Books I’ve Owned the Longest
and Still Plan to Read Someday

I bought so many Kindle books back in the day that I’d love to return. My reading tastes have definitely changed since 2009-2011 when I first got my Kindle(s). Fun fact: the first Kindle book I ever bought and read was The Hunger Games. That was fun to see when looking at my Amazon history! I remember reading it during college nonstop, whenever I wasn’t working on homework. Here are ten ebooks I’ve owned foooorever and still think I’ll read at some point in the future…


The Secret Life of Prince Charming

The Secret Life of Prince Charming by Deb Caletti
On my Kindle since 2011

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

This is definitely the kind of book I used to reach for, but I can still see some of its appeal for my current reading tastes. People coming together to get information and learn about their family, past mistakes, etc. is definitely a topic I’m still interested in reading about. I love seeing the journeys people take and new relationships developing along the way.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Determined to, for once, take action in her life, Quinn joins forces with the half sister she’s never met and the little sister she’ll do anything to protect. Together, they set out to right her father’s wrongs…and in doing so, begin to uncover what they’re really looking for: the truth.”


Matched by Allie CondieMatched (Matched, #1)
On my Kindle since 2013

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

I don’t know why but this series has always intrigued me. I remember seeing it on bookshelves back in the day and wanting to give it a shot. I think I bought it during a Kindle sale after college but haven’t sat down with it. The synopsis implies a love triangle, which I need to be in the mood for, so we’ll see if and when this one actually happens for me.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“…when her best friend appears on the Matching screen, Cassia knows with complete certainty that he is the one…until she sees another face flash for an instant before the screen fades to black.”


Extremely Loud and Incredibly CloseExtremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer
On my Kindle since 2011

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

I started this book when I first bought it but I wasn’t really in a literary fiction mood at the time. I did the bad book lover thing by also seeing the movie first. I did enjoy the movie a lot and still plan to give the book another shot. This is one of those old books I put on hold and never got to again… not really a DNF but you know what it was like in those pre-blogging days. In any case, the September 11th stuff doesn’t usually resonate with me but I love the different people he meets on his journey. That’s a key read-bait for me these days.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Centre, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father’s closet. It is a search which leads him into the lives of strangers, through the five boroughs of New York, into history, to the bombings of Dresden and Hiroshima, and on an inward journey which brings him ever closer to some kind of peace.”


Feminism and Pop CultureFeminism and Pop Culture by Andi Zeisler
On my Kindle since 2013

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

I’m a huge fan of Bitch Magazine and remember instantly buying it one day when I saw it was by the co-founder of Bitch Media. I’ve become increasingly interested in getting back to reading feminist books (especially nonfiction) since the election, so this should be a top priority. The intersection of feminism/sexism and pop culture has interested me for years now.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Whether or not we like to admit it, pop culture is a lens through which we alternately view and shape the world around us. When it comes to feminism, pop culture aids us in translating feminist philosophies, issues, and concepts into everyday language, making them relevant and relatable.”


The Rosie Project (Don Tillman, #1)The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

Many bloggers were rating this one 4-5 stars when I first started my blog in 2014. I had just purchased it beforehand, actually, but seeing those ratings didn’t bump it up on my TBR. The reason I’ve put it off over the years is because I was never drawn to adult fiction as often as YA. This has definitely changed since last year though, so I do see myself trying it out at some point.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“…when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a “wonderful” husband, his first reaction is shock. Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and he embarks upon The Wife Project. In the orderly, evidence-based manner with which he approaches all things, Don sets out to find the perfect partner.”


The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina KeeganThe Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

This book will be hard to read, yet I have a morbid fascination with it. The author of these stories died five days after her college graduation. Her family and friends published these essays, which are full of hope and possibility. It’s an ironic and sad thought. I know I will read this someday but I have a bad feeling I’ll cry or something.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Even though she was just twenty-two when she died, Marina left behind a rich, expansive trove of prose that, like her title essay, captures the hope, uncertainty, and possibility of her generation. The Opposite of Loneliness is an assem­blage of Marina’s essays and stories that, like The Last Lecture, articulates the universal struggle that all of us face as we figure out what we aspire to be and how we can harness our talents to make an impact on the world.”


Larger Than Life

Larger than Life by Jodi Picoult
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

Believe it or not, Jodi Picoult was a favorite author before I started blogging. Since I created this blog? I have not read a single book by her. It’s crazy too because I got my stepmom into her books and she keeps handing them to me afterward… but I just don’t get around to them. This is one I bought for Kindle back in 2014 before my blog and it has been sitting there ever since. To be honest, the synopsis doesn’t grab me that much (even though I love elephants), so I may read another Picoult before this one to get back into her writing. We’ll see!

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“A researcher studying memory in elephants, Alice is fascinated by the bonds between mother and calf—the mother’s powerful protective instincts and her newborn’s unwavering loyalty… She must only observe and never interfere. Then she finds an orphaned young elephant in the bush and cannot bear to leave the helpless baby behind. Thinking back on her own childhood, and on her shifting relationship with her mother, Alice risks her career to care for the calf. Yet what she comes to understand is the depth of a parent’s love. “


How to LoveHow to Love by Katie Cotugno
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

I’ve had this book on my Kindle for years but still haven’t read it, even though I LOVED Cotugno’s 99 Days. I feel like she has a way of writing difficult stories with flawed characters in a very accessible way. I think I haven’t jumped on this one because I don’t enjoy stories with pregnancy and/or little kids (YA or NA ones at least). I know I’ll get to it at some point because she’s such a talented writer. I love second chance romance stories too.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Reena and Sawyer fall in messy, complicated love. But then Sawyer disappears from their humid Florida town without a word, leaving a devastated—and pregnant—Reena behind… Almost three years have passed… Reena’s gotten used to being without Sawyer, and she’s finally getting the hang of this strange, unexpected life. But just as swiftly and suddenly as he disappeared, Sawyer turns up again. Reena doesn’t want anything to do with him, though she’d be lying if she said Sawyer’s being back wasn’t stirring something in her.”


Attachments by Rainbow RowellAttachments
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

I have a complicated relationship with Rainbow Rowell books. I loved Eleanor & Park, didn’t mind Landline (so many good quotes), and strongly disliked Fangirl. I’ve seen and heard that this one is very good and very underrated, so I hope it works for me. I think the synopsis itself sounds like something I’d love at least!

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail… They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives… Meanwhile, Lincoln O’Neill can’t believe this is his job now- reading other people’s e-mail…When Lincoln comes across Beth’s and Jennifer’s messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can’t help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories. By the time Lincoln realizes he’s falling for Beth, it’s way too late to introduce himself.”


The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle HodkinThe Unbecoming of Mara Dyer (Mara Dyer, #1)
On my Kindle since 2014

Why I’ll probably still read it at some point:

This series is a favorite of many bloggers and it’s still on my TBR for a reason. I love memory loss stories and I’ve heard there’s a boy here worth reading about 😉 I think I was originally waiting for all three books to come out, but now that they have… I have no excuse. Hopefully I get to it soon when I’m in the mood for something a little creepy.

Key piece of the synopsis for me:

“Mara Dyer believes life can’t get any stranger than waking up in a hospital with no memory of how she got there. It can. She believes there must be more to the accident she can’t remember that killed her friends and left her strangely unharmed. There is.


What do you think?
Should these still be on my TBR?

17 responses to “Ten eBooks I’ve Owned FOREVER

  1. I love this idea! I still have Attachments (and most of Rowell’s books, opps), The Evolution of Mara Dyer and How to Love on my kindle backlist too. I def need to get to them asap! But ugh, I have read Matched and just, umm, no. I do not recommend it! It’s one of the most cliche, cheesiest, horrible dystopians you’ll ever read. It rips of The Giver and throws in a tonne of awkward YA tropes on top of it – including the dreaded love triangle. I wouldn’t recommend bothering with that one!

  2. Oh love this idea and may have to do a post for mine too!! I am a huge Attachments fan and just did a relisten. LOVED The Rosie Project. I think I have seen The Opposite of Loneliness and never knew what it was about. I want to read How to Love because I loved 99 Days.

  3. I also have had The Opposite of Loneliness on my Kindle for ages! I definitely want to read it at some point, but yeah, I think it might be a hard read at times. I’m surprised you haven’t read Mara Dyer! I sped through that series like lightening when I was in high school, but I recently reread the first book and kinda hated it, hahaha.

  4. I love Mara Dyer, but not so much with Matched. Mara Dyer is dark and can be very creepy, so if you’re into psychological thriller, you’ll love it 😀 As for Matched, it just feels very generic and boring for me haha! I hope you’ll enjoy them though 🙂

  5. You have some really great books and I hope that you will read them soon, but I am the same way with many kindle books. My recommendations would be Attachments and How to Love to start with.

  6. It’s so easy to forget or ignore those ebooks! Out of sight, out of mind. I hope you get around to read them. Especially Attachments and Mara Dyer. I love both of those so much! Thanks for linking up my post. 🙂

  7. The Mara Dyer books are super addicting– but also I didn’t love them?? Maybe it was the romance. I kind of don’t like it when someone has something really messed up going on in their life and a guy is like OMG I LOVE YOU. Like, maybe what she really needs right now is a friend?? And not to be swooning over some guy? But the writing is very addicting and I read all 3 books super fast.

    I love Deb Caletti’s books. I don’t think that one up there was one of my faves, but I liked the characters.

    And WHAT?? You didn’t like Fangirl?? The shame!! LOL, just kidding– but OMG I loved that book 🙂

  8. JODI PICOULT WAS MY FAVORITE PRE-BLOGGING AUTHOR TOO #twinningagain I was SO obsessed with her books in high school (I think Nineteen Minutes and Keepy Faith were my favorites). Also, I hate to tell you but Matched was a total dud for me…I hope you have better luck with it!

  9. Yes! All of the ones I’ve read are worth reading (Matched, Larger Than Life, The Rosie Project, Attachments, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close). It’s hard to read older titles when so many good books keep coming out. Your post reminded me that I still haven’t read The Handmaid’s Tale, which has been on my phone (Kindle app) forever. I just bought the Audible version because I’m more likely to listen to it than I am to read it. But now that there’s a TV show, I need to get to it ASAP. 🙂

    Kate @ Opinionated Book Lover recently posted: Review: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

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